Keeping a Loved One with Alzheimer’s Safe during an Emergency Room Visit

  • April 25, 2017

According to the most recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19.6 million seniors over the age of 65 visited hospital emergency rooms in 2010. Twenty-nine percent of these visits were related to fall injuries. 

Seniors, including those with Alzheimer’s, may also end up in the emergency room for other reasons including:
  • Dehydration
  • Medication mistakes
  • Acute illness
If you’re caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, you face unique challenges keeping them safe in the loud, confusing environment of an emergency room. We have a few ideas that may help.
Alzheimer’s & Emergency Room Safety

1. Avoid the emergency room if you can. 

Whenever possible, see if your loved one’s primary care physician will treat them in the office. Or consider visiting an urgent care center. These treatment centers are often more convenient, less crowded, and not as noisy as emergency rooms. They may also be open when your doctor’s office is not. 

Today’s urgent care centers often have onsite x-ray machines and other diagnostic equipment. They may be able to draw blood for testing, too. The doctors on staff may even be able to administer IVs to treat dehydration. 

2. Stay by your loved one’s side. 

When bringing a loved one with Alzheimer’s to the emergency room, try to bring another friend or family member along with the two of you. One can converse with the staff while the other stays with the senior to ease their agitation and make sure they are comfortable. 

The one who will be speaking with the doctors should introduce themselves and explain the senior’s diagnosis and situation. 

3. Bring important information the ER doctors may need 

Bringing your senior loved one’s medical information with you can help provide physicians with the medical history they need to safely care for your loved one. 

This paperwork should include: 

4. Ask the staff if it’s possible to minimize noise and remove anything that could frighten your loved one. 

It’s impossible to keep an emergency room quiet, but you may be able to ask staff to place privacy curtains around your loved one or to have your family member moved to a less busy area of the E.R. Any artwork on the walls, bright patterns, or disturbing shapes should be removed to reduce your loved one’s agitation. 

5. Give your loved one something to do. 

If your loved one is conscious and alert, especially if the immediate danger has passed and you are awaiting test results or admission into a hospital room, focus on keeping them busy. 

Consider bringing a fidget blanket or tangle fidget toy to soothe your loved one. 

Remember, as the caregiver of a senior with Alzheimer’s, your objective is to help ensure your loved one gets the best medical care possible while keeping them in a positive frame of mind. 

Need Help with Memory Care? 

Five Star Senior Living can help you cope with life as a caregiver. Make an appointment to tour a memory care community today

Pillar tags:

51 Warning Signs

51 Warning Signs

As you care for your aging loved ones, learn how to spot unusual behaviors ranging from poor nutrition to depression.

Download the eBook
Link to Five Star Premier Residences of Chevy Chase Landing Page

Featured
Community Near You

Five Star Premier Residences of Chevy Chase

Available Services

  • Independent Living
  • Assisted Living
Explore Now

Or Search All Communities

Share This Article with Friends or Family

 
 
   
   

Related Articles

10 Methods to Calm Agitation and Aggression in Older Adults with Alzheimer's

10 Methods to Calm Agitation and Aggression in Older Adults with Alzheimer's

January 19, 2016

Read More »


Alzheimer’s Care

7 Tips for Helping a Senior with Alzheimer’s Move

7 Tips for Helping a Senior with Alzheimer’s Move

January 17, 2017

Read More »


Health & Wellness

4 Triggers That May Cause Wandering in a Senior with Alzheimer’s | Five Star

4 Triggers That May Cause Wandering in a Senior with Alzheimer’s | Five Star

March 03, 2015

Read More »


Alzheimer’s Care